Molecular Biology for Computer Scientists,
Mathematicians and Engineers
BIO 5099 (3 credits)
CU Denver/Auraria Library 004 (Directions)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:00-5:15pm
TA office hours Tuesdays 1:30-2:30pm (Directions)
Available by video links on other campuses
Prof. Larry Hunter
Office: SoM #2817b
Office phone: 303-315-1094
E-mail: Larry.Hunter@ucdenver.edu
http://compbio.ucdenver.edu/Hunter/
Home Syllabus Glossary Lecture Notes Homework Project/Exam

Semester Project / Exam

Weekly homework assignments and the quiz (drop 2) account for 440 points of your final grade. The last 110 points are for an in-class exam or a project, i.e. will account for 20% of your final grade.

Exam Option

Students have the option of writing an in-class exam on Tuesday, December 10, which should take approximately 1 hour to complete. The exam will have the same breadth as the homework assignments, but will not require the same depth. You should have a strong vocabulary and a general knowledge of the topics covered. There will be one "free answer" question that will require you to explain a topic of your choice in detail, from a list to be given several weeks beforehand.

Project

Alternately, you may turn in a written report on December 10 about a scientific journal article, newer than 1990.

  • You may turn your paper in any time before December 10. Drop boxes will be available in Larry's office at the UCHSC and in the Mathematics department on the 6th floor of the CU Building.
  • You must also turn in a copy of the paper you chose to write about.
  • If you choose to submit your paper via e-mail, it must be sent to Christiaan at christiaan@xiaan.com and you must receive an e-mail from Christiaan confirming the receipt of your paper. A PDF or PS printable version is preferred, otherwise submit a Microsoft Word document; don't use special fonts, etc. that may hinder the printing/rendering of the document. LaTeX DVI output is also acceptable.
  • The offer still exists for you to submit an outline or rough draft for critique, please do so via e-mail with the above restrictions on format.
  • And finally, another reminder that you should be using formal written english; see the link below to the Elements of Style.
Some advice as you start research and writing:
  • Consider the other students in the class to be your audience, write accordingly.
  • Write using formal English; a great reference is Struck's Elements of Style.
  • In your paper, you should digest, reformulate, and extend.
  • You might make it 4-6 pages; long enough to properly explore the topic, but not too long that it would be easier to read the original paper.
  • You might explore topics in the paper that are assumed knowledge if the topic is something you had to research to fully understand the paper.
  • You might explore futher avenues of research, some possible inferences about other organisms, pathways, whatever is appropriate.
  • A part of your grade will measure how well you incorporate the vocabulary you've learned in (and out of) class to articulate your thoughts.
  • You can submit an outline or draft at any time to Christiaan or Raphael and get feedback.
You may start your search in the following publications: Example articles:

General Guidelines

  • Choose an article approximately 5 pages in length, for your sake.
  • Relate the article to what you've learned this semester in the class.
  • You may ask Raphael or Christiaan for ideas and guidance, please do so!
  • You must have chosen the exam/project option by November 7, 2002. It will be a good idea to have chosen an article by then.
  • The project is due on the same day as the exam, December 10, 2002.



Home Syllabus Glossary Lecture Notes Homework Project/Exam

This document last modified 08/09/10 13:08.